How do you feel about vaping vitamins?

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Most of us know to vape as a way to quit smoking, an alternative and less health risky way of getting nicotine into our body. However, there are lots more things other than nicotine that you can vape, apparently — and we are not just talking CBD or THC. Some people are vaping vitamins.

 

According to advocates of the trend,  puffing on nicotine-free, tobacco-free vitamin cocktails, they can receive all the nutritional value of the vitamins in a new and more efficient manner. 

 

One of the biggest companies that currently sell vapable vitamins is VitaminVape. The company’s most popular product is Vitamin B12 Vapor, which is supposed to be a better and more efficient way of consuming the vitamin. According to the website, vaping B12 is “many times more efficient than pill absorption, and comparable only to injections (though injections are still the most efficient).”

 

Theoretically, one can see how this would make sense. After all, inhaling things is quite an efficient way of getting them into your bloodstream — as is the case with asthma meds, for instance. However, there is also a catch. According to Julie Devinsky, RD, a clinical dietitian at The Mount Sinai Hospital in NYC who spoke to Cosmopolitan on this issue, our gastrointestinal tracts are designed to absorb nutrients while the same definitely can not be said about our lungs. Thus, it would be hard to know if the needed elements actually make it into our bloodstream at all.

 

Moreover, there is also concern about what happens when you heat the vitamins in order to turn them into vapor and whether high temperatures would affect the safety and quality of the ingredients. And, as vapable vitamins are not regulated by the FDA, there is no way of confirming or disproving this theory — at least, for now.

 

Have you tried vaping vitamins? What has been your experience?

 

“There’s no evidence that inhaling vitamins through vaping has any benefit,” says Humberto Choi, MD, a pulmonologist with the Cleveland Clinic. And they’re not regulated by the FDA, meaning there’s no way to confirm they contain what they say they do.

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